The Best Herbs for Lyme Disease Treatment

The Best Herbs for Lyme Disease Treatment

The Best Herbs for Lyme Disease Treatment

 

No one person shares the exact same symptom presentation of Lyme disease and co-infections; as well people with Lyme disease infections are at different stages of the disease, so no treatment is the same. However, there does exist the best herbs for Lyme disease treatment that are shared among all stages and all symptom presentations.

 

Some of the Best Herbs for Lyme Disease 

 

  1. San lian – Combination of 3 of the most anti-microbial herbs. Immune support.
    1. Scutellaria – Found effective against wide spectrum anti-bacterial, antifungal, anti-yeast, antifungal, anti-spirochetal. Has been shown effective against pharmaceutical resistant candida. Has been shown to reduce neurological symptoms and immune reactions. Fever reduction, pain reduction. Scutellaria is one of the most heavily researched herbs against many other heavily researched herbs. Studies have shown scutellaria to be the most effective against wide range bacteria, fungus, yeast, pharmaceutical Fluconazole resistant candida and more. This makes scutellaria one of the best herbs for Lyme disease.
      1. Philodendron – Found effective against wide spectrum antibacterial, antifungal, anti-yeast, antifungal, anti-spirochetal. Has been shown to reduce neurological symptoms and immune reactions. Fever reduction, pain reduction.
      2. Coptis – Found effective against wide spectrum antibacterial, antifungal, anti-yeast, antifungal, anti-spirochetal. Has been shown to reduce pain, neurological symptoms and immune reactions. Fever reduction, pain reduction.
  2. Olive Leaf – Found effective against wide spectrum antibacterial, wide spectrum antimicrobial, antifungal, anti-yeast, antifungal, anti-spirochetal. Cardiovascular adaptogen. Fever reduction, pain reduction.
  3. Yan hu so – Corydalis – Best herbs for pain reduction in the joints and limbs. As well, pain associated with chest pains and costochondritis. This herb works synergistically with Szechuan lovage root to help push blood through the dilated capillaries (from Szechuan lovage root) and hard to reach areas of the body.
  4. Ku shen – Sophora Root – Has shown to possess anti-parasitic, antifungal; helps reduce skin reactions and itching.
  5. Xu duan – Teasel – Helps the body regenerate and repair. Also has shown to help increase energy and has shown to be helpful in helping the body fight infections associated with Lyme disease.
  6. Gui zhi – Cinnamon Twig – Anti-microbial, pain reduction, cardiovascular, heart/kidney health. Key herb for pain in the joints and heart function. This herb helps boost the immune system by warming, stimulating and harmonizing the kidney, liver, spleen and stomach.
  7. Chuan xiong – Cnidium Root – Dilates the vessels and helps push the blood through tiny capillaries. This herb helps guide the antimicrobial properties of other herbs into difficult to reach places of the body. Restrict caffeine when using this herb. Properties of this herb penetrates the blood brain barrier to increase circulation and dilate the capillaries in the brain. This herb has been shown to be helpful in reducing abdominal pains.
  8. Ren dong teng – Lonicera Stem – Helps with detoxification – specifically to cool the blood associated with “fire toxin” bartonella, babesia, mycoplasma, etc.
  9. Jin yin hua – Lonicera Flower – Helps with detoxification – specifically to cool the blood associated with “fire toxin” bartonella, babesia, mycoplasma, etc. Helps calm the mind and relive anxiety and depression.
  10. Qing hao – Wormwood Leaf – May possess strong anti-malarial activity containing artemisinin. Co-infection herb. Helps reduce pain in the muscles and fascia. May be helpful in the reduction of chest cramping pains (costochondritis), electrical-like sharp shooting pains, burning pain, night sweats, nightmares, emotional disharmonies such as bipolar episodes, depression, anxiety, vascular issues and neurological symptoms. Wormwood is considered one of the chief herbs for co-infections, making it one of the best herbs for Lyme disease.
  11. Ai ye – Wormwood Stem – May possess strong anti-malarial activity containing artemisinin. Co-infection herb. Helps reduce pain in the joints, limbs, cartilage, ligaments and tendon. May be helpful in the reduction of chest cramping pains (costochondritis), electrical-like sharp shooting pains, burning pain, night sweats, nightmares, emotional disharmonies such as bipolar episodes, depression, anxiety, vascular issues and neurological symptoms. Wormwood is considered one of the chief herbs for co-infections, making it one of the best herbs for Lyme disease.
  12. Wormwood Flower – May possess strong anti-malarial activity containing artemisinin. Co-infection herb. Helps reduce pain in the joints, limbs, cartilage, ligaments and tendon. Helps calm the mind with anxiety. May be helpful in the reduction of chest cramping pains (costochondritis), electrical-like sharp shooting pains, burning pain, night sweats, nightmares, emotional disharmonies such as bipolar episodes, depression, anxiety, vascular issues and neurological symptoms. Wormwood is considered one of the chief herbs for co-infections, making it one of the best herbs for Lyme disease.
  13. Artemisinin Extract – May possess strong anti-malarial activity. Co-infection support. May be helpful in the reduction of chest cramping pains (costochondritis), electrical-like sharp shooting pains, burning pain, night sweats, nightmares, emotional disharmonies such as bipolar episodes, depression, anxiety, vascular issues and neurological symptoms.
  14. Cryptolepis – May possess strong anti-malarial activity containing cryptolepines. Co-infection support. Rotate together every 8 weeks with sida acuta to offset the potential for co-infection microbial resistance against artemisinin. May be helpful in the reduction of chest cramping pains (costochondritis), electrical-like sharp shooting pains, burning pain, night sweats, nightmares, emotional disharmonies such as bipolar episodes, depression, anxiety, vascular issues and neurological symptoms. Because of the cryptolepine content of cryptolepis, it is one of the chief herbs for co-infections and one of the best herbs for Lyme disease. Cryptolepis should be rotated every 8 weeks with wormwood and or artemisinin to offset the potential for microbial resistance.
  15. Sida Acuta – May possess strong anti-malarial activity. Co-infection support. Rotate together every 8 weeks with sida acuta to offset the potential for co-infection microbial resistance against artemisinin. Because of the cryptolepine content of sida acuta, it is one of the chief herbs for co-infections and one of the best herbs for Lyme disease. Sida acuta should be rotated every 8 weeks with wormwood and or artemisinin to offset the potential for microbial resistance.
  16. Cinchona – May possess strong anti-malarial activity (quinine). Co-infection support. Rotate together every 8 weeks with sida acuta to offset the potential for co-infection microbial resistance against artemisinin.
  17. Hong hua – Safflower – Guides antimicrobial properties of other herbs through the capillaries. Strong blood mover, cardiovascular support, pain reduction support.
  18. Cao guo – Tsaoko Root – May possess strong anti-malarial activity. Co-infection support. This herb has strong
  19. Chai hu – Bupleurum Root – May possess strong anti-malarial activity. Co-infection support. Supports the liver with detoxification, reduces liver inflammation.
  20. Huo po – Magnolia Bark – Helps soothe the stomach, improve digestion and increase energy.
  21. Dan shen – Red Sage Root – Cardiovascular adaptogen and helps calm the mind.
  22. Mu dan pi – Cortex Moutan – Cools the blood associated with co-infection – fire toxin. Helps move the bowels, reduce skin flares and may possess strong antimicrobial properties.
  23. Qing pi – Green Tangerine Peel – Contains high concentrations of hesperidin and other biochemical properties that have been known to be helpful in cleaning the spleen, stomach and vascular plaques, thus assisting the biochemical properties of the antimicrobial herbs to get to areas of hidden pathogens. This herb can be a key herb to improve digestion and the integrity of the cardiovascular system. This can be a key herb to help reverse atherosclerosis and arterial stenosis.
  24. Hespiridin – May be helpful in helping to dissolve vascular plaques and reduce/repair varicosity. Helpful in removing plaque material from the vessels to help expose hidden pathogen in the vessel tissue. Helps guide antimicrobial properties of other herbs into the tissue of the vessels. This herb may be helpful in making the tissues of the body more receptive and available to receive the biochemical properties of the antimicrobial herbs.
  25. Di long – Earthworm – This herb may be helpful in helping the body reduce neurological symptoms. As well, it may be helpful in dissolving biofilms and cysts. This herb contains lumbrokinase, serrapeptase and other dissolving properties of foreign substances in the body. As well, this herb possesses strong antimicrobial properties. Di long may also play the same significant role with cardiovascular benefits that qing pi does. In fact, di long and qing pi when used together optimize the results.
  26. Zao jiao ci – Gleditsia Thorn – May possess strong antiparasitic properties. Key herb with biochemical properties such as fisetin, fustain and protocatechuic acid that penetrates the blood/brain barrier to dissolve plaques and pierce through stubborn cystic forms thus reducing stagnation in the brain improving memory.
  27. Lian qiao – Forsythia – Only to be used in certain stages of treatment (after people feel significantly better). This herb helps moisten hardness, such as plaque and cyst material, thus assisting other properties of other cyst/plaque/biofilm dissolving herbs to expose hidden pathogen so the antimicrobial properties of the antimicrobial herbs can get into these areas and help the body do their job.
  28. Zhi zi – Gardenia – Only to be used in certain stages of treatment (after people feel significantly better. This herb helps moisten hardness, such as plaque and cyst material, thus assisting other properties of other cyst/plaque/biofilm dissolving herbs to expose hidden pathogen so the antimicrobial properties of the antimicrobial herbs can get into these areas and help the body do their job.
  29. Siberian Ginseng – Assists with energy, adrenal and immune support. It takes energy to help the body fight infections. This herb can be helpful with sleep. If one is far too fatigued, they may not be able to sleep. So by assisting with energy, one will have a better chance of being able to sleep.
  30. Eucommia – Assists with energy support, rebuilding damaged tissues, cardiovascular, kidney and liver support. May improve sleep, energy level, reduction of fatigue and adrenal fatigue. This may be a key herb to reduce fatigue and increase energy.
  31. Milk thistle – Has been shown to help protect the liver from liver inflammation that can lead to liver fibrosis  cirrhosis and cancer. This herb is a key herb to help support the liver during a long detoxification phase. f
  32. Ashwagandha – This herb may be helpful in protecting the adrenals and kidneys during treatment. Has been shown to be helpful in managing healthy cortisol levels and preventing adrenal fatigue.
  33. Da huang (Rhubarb Root) – Da huang is considered on of the chief herbs for constipation without causing dependence. Da huang (atractylodis) can be helpful in relieving constipation. Da huang does contain polysaccharides and should not be used unless absolutely needed to keep the bowels moving.
  34. Special undisclosed herbs to be used by qualified practitioners only. These herbs are not found on the market. They are not found on Amazon, in health food stores or herb stores. These herbs are used to rapidly break open cysts and dissolve biofilms more-so than any known herb. In fact, one cup of tea will help the body break open many micro-cysts and or one large cyst within 20 minutes of drinking. These are not the weaker, more generalized herbs like di long (lumbrokinase, serrapeptase) and san leng (Sparganii) and e zhu (Zedoria curcuma) that are used for dissolving cysts and biofilms slower over time. These undisclosed herbs are not advertised for their use and they are not taught to use this way in school for Chinese medicine. These are secrets that are handed down from skilled and well known herbalists in China to their students. They are not inhumanely harvested animal extracted herbs. If these herbs are used at the wrong time with Lyme disease, undesirable results can manifest. When they are used at the right time (toward the end of treatment) and with the right combination of other herbs, they can best assure true remission without relapse.

 


How to Ensure the Best Herbs for Lyme Disease do Their Job

 

Half of a successful natural Lyme disease treatment is to effectively prevent immune reactions. In order to keep the immune system from firing in an excess manner with cytokine reactions, mast cell activation syndrome reactions and histamine reactions, we need to get the immune system to quiet down and keep it quiet.

In order to prevent immune reactions, we need to prevent pathogenic excitement. One important aspect of a natural Lyme disease treatment that prevents immune reactions (symptoms), is to adhere to the Lyme disease diet. Lyme disease pathogens are like a fire in the body. When we spritz a campfire with the slightest spritz of alcohol, the fire flares. The same thing goes for infections. When we eat the slightest amount of the wrong thing, the infections get excited. When the bugs get excited, the immune system senses this and then turns on in a hyperactive manner. When the immune system becomes hyperactive, symptoms occur. When symptoms occur, treatment results are limited at best. That said, we want to prevent pathogenic excitement. Adhering to the Lyme disease diet helps prevent and lessen symptoms and better assures the effectiveness of the Lyme disease treatment.

It is essential, regardless how one chooses to treat themselves, to learn how to keep the cytokine reactions under control, because if one doesn’t, no treatment will be effective. The Lyme disease diet is one of a few essential practices to help prevent inflammation and keep other symptoms under control. If the Lyme disease diet is adhered to, but the other aspects are not put into practice, symptoms are likely to manifest.

 


10 Qualities that Make the Best Herbs for Lyme Disease

 

  • The best herbs for Lyme disease should be used together with other herbs. This is how Chinese herbal medicine works. Herbs compliment each other and make each other work. As well, without addressing all aspects of the healing process, healing cannot happen. That said a holistic approach to using herbs of different functions with each other are essential; rather than just using antimicrobial herbs.
  • Full Spectrum anti-microbial range – Leave no intruder (LNI). Herbs to help the body address all pathogenic categories, such as yeast, candida, mold, fungal, parasitic, virus and protozoan infections.
  • Herbs that dissolve foreign material in the body, such as atherosclerotic plaques, scar tissue and toxic material.
  • Herbs that penetrate the blood/brain barrier to help increase cerebral circulation, dissolve amyloid plaques in the brain and help the body kill microbes found in the brain tissue.
  • Herbs with no polysaccharides that feed infections such as sucrose, fructose, alpha-galactose, and more. There are some polysaccharides that do not feed and excite infections. If we use herbs that have the wrong kind of polysaccharides, we end up chasing our tail in treatment. We may get better, but not often all the way. Some popular examples are astragalus, Japanese knotweed, and many other popular Lyme herbs that are based off of one researcher/herbalist.
  • Herbs to protect the liver during treatment. The liver processes toxins. When pathogenic toxins repeatedly come into contact with the liver during detoxification, it irritates the liver. When the liver gets irritated it can become inflamed. A chronic inflamed liver can lead to fibrosis  cirrhosis  Therefore, by protecting the liver with certain herbs, we can prevent or limit liver inflammation.
  • Herbs to protect the kidneys. Infections steal energy from the body, thus taxing the kidneys/adrenals. By supporting the kidneys/adrenals with the proper herbs, we can prevent further adrenal fatigue.
  • Herbs to support the body’s systems, as well, organ protection and function.
  • Herbs to clean up vascular plaques, cysts and biofilms to expose hidden pathogens, when the time is right. If this is done too soon when one is in a moderate to severe state of chronic symptoms, then more fuel will be added to the fire of symptoms; and could be dangerous.
  • Herbs to reduce pain – Pain reducing herbs are herbs that increase circulation. There are specific herbs that increase circulation in specific areas of the body.

 


Types of Herbs Used

 

  • Roots tonify, increase energy, rebuild nerve tissue, regenerate the body, protect the adrenals and kidneys and more. Roots are also rich in anti-microbial properties. But to find roots without polysaccharides is an art.
  • Stems and stalks reduce pain, guide the antimicrobial properties of antimicrobial herbs to all areas of the body. Roots increase circulation, dilate blood vessels, and help the cardiovascular system. Some stems and stalks are deeply cleansing to the interior lining of the blood vessels. Bad microbes hide behind plaques and embed themselves in vascular tissue. In order for the antimicrobial properties to do their job efficiently, we need to clean the lining of the vascular walls, so the antimicrobial properties can penetrate into the vascular tissue. Stems and stalks help with this as well as other aggressive herbs, which we will discuss. Stems and stalks are also rich in antimicrobial properties. Stems and stalks are the woody aspect of plant medicine. They help guide antimicrobial properties to these areas of the body and help regenerate cartilage, tendon and ligament. 
  • Leaves are rich in antimicrobial properties. They make up the body of the plant. Leaves help regenerate the muscle, fascia and more fleshy aspects of the body. Leaves help reduce inflammation and pain in the fleshy tissues of the body.
  • Flowers are rich in micronutrients that help ease and calm anxiety, manage depression and uplift the mind. There are some quite magical components of flowers we will not discuss here, however, their use is essential for assistance with Lyme treatment. 
  • Seeds many times contain polysaccharides, so one must be careful not to use seeds that contain them. Seeds help moisten the large intestine and help move the bowels. Seeds also help nourish the body and increase energy. Like the Chinese herb nan gua zhi, seeds can possess powerful antimicrobial properties of certain microbes.
  • Barks – Help increase circulation, reduce pain and reduce skin presentations, such as psoriasis, eczema and heat rashes.
  • Saps – Saps flow through the inside of tree trunks and branches, unobstructed from anything in its way.Saps do the same in the same in the body. They clean the inside of the body and increase the flow of blood, lymph and body fluids. Saps will guide antimicrobial properties of the antimicrobial herbs to many of the hard to reach areas of the body. Some saps can penetrate the blood brain barrier and increase circulation in the brain.
  • Thorns – Thorns possess properties that dissolve plaques, cysts and biofilms. They also stop bleeding internally and heal internal and external wounds. Some thorns also possess specific strong antimicrobial properties.

 

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Trillium Health Solutions

7.29.2021

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