Scutellaria – Huang Qin

Scutellaria - Chinese Huang Qin

Huang qin – Scutellariae Radix – Chief Antimicrobial Herb

Root Functions: Antibacterial, anti-spirochetal, anti-viral, anti-yeast, anti-fungal.

Western Symptom functions: Relieve pain, increase cognition, reduce fatigue, improve digestion, improve circulation, improve vision and many other symptoms associated with Lyme related disease. Properties of this herb have been shown to suppress immune reactions as well cytokine and mast cell reactions, which present with symptoms associated with Lyme disease and symptoms of many other auto-immune presentations.91

Western properties: Due to huang qin’s berberine and baicalin content, huang qin has been found to have significant effectiveness against fluconazole resistant candida, as well, has been found to be the most aggressive herb against other yeasts, molds, fungi and bacteria. Chinese huang qin in another study was found to have the highest success rate against the most variety of pathogenic microbes. Studies also show huang qin helps the body prevent and reduce inflammation in all parts of the body, as well help lower blood sugar. Another study showed significance with the relaxation of vascular smooth muscle that led to the lowering of blood pressure. 4,774 studies and research articles on huang qin have been published in one single database. Thousands of studies have been done on its individual biochemical components, making huang qin a key herb in managing symptoms and addressing the root cause of many diseases associated with Lyme related disease.

Western Bioactive Biomedical Biochemical Compounds: Baicalin, Berberine, Baicalein, Wobonin, Phelledendrine, Scutellarin, Chrysin and many more.

Antimicrobial Activity of Scutellaria

Active against fluconazole resistant candida, yeasts, fungi, mold, bacteria, viruses. Baicalin, an active component in huang qin has been shown to reduce and prevent biofilms as well as has shown to possess strong antibacterial and antiviral properties.

Baicalin

Baicalin has also been shown to reduce neurological pain as well as hyperalgesia.

Helps regulate blood sugar, blood pressure and has anti-inflammatory properties. Helps prevent and reduce liver inflammation associated with NAFLD, hepatitis and excess detoxification.

Chinese medicine description:

Huang qin addresses damp heat. It is a cold, bitter herb that removes toxicity and is used with warm aspects of disease. Huang qin’s cold aspect assists with cooling symptoms associated with warm heat pathogenic disease.

Huang qin’s bitter flavor attributes to the significant antimicrobial properties and drying dampness. Dampness is associated with pathogenic mucus, phlegm which can be associated with protective mucus layers, yeasts and candida.

Huang qin sedates Liver yang for symptoms such as persistent irritability, vertigo, insomnia, anxiety, headaches, red eyes and flushed face.

Huang qin is helpful with reducing fevers associated with Lupus associated with Lyme related disease, liver inflammation, jaundice, and diarrhea.

Huang qin combined with cao guo, chai hu, ai ye and qing hao, is commonly used for intra-cellular or malarial-like infections. Cao guo, chai hu, ai ye and qing hao are the intra-cellular herbs in Intra-Cell I.

Huang qin is shown to possess biochemical properties that promotes neuroprotective effects and reduces neurological symptoms.

Huang qin enhanced cognition in a study of Alzheimer’s patients by suppressing immune responses associated with genetic expression, increasing glutathione in the brain and by many other actions. In another study, biochemical properties of huang qin inhibited iron accumulation in regions of the brain associated with Parkinon’s. Biochemical properties of Huang Qin have shown effectiveness with stroke prevention, seizure prevention and the reversal of depressive disorders.

References:

  • Trinh H, Yoo Y, Won K-H, et al. Evaluation of in-vitro antimicrobial activity of Artemisia apiacea H. and Scutellaria baicalensis G. extracts. Journal Of Medical Microbiology. 2018;67(4):489-495. doi:10.1099/jmm.0.000709.
  • ARITULUK ZC, KOÇAK CÖ, RENDA G, EKİZOĞLU M, EZER N. Antimicrobial activity of three Scutellaria L. species from Turkey. Marmara Pharmaceutical Journal. 2019;23(3):552-558. doi:10.12991/jrp.2019.162.
  • Franzblau SG, Cross C. Comparative in vitro antimicrobial activity of Chinese medicinal herbs. Journal Of Ethnopharmacology. 1986;15(3):279-288.
  • Zhang C, Sheng J, Sarsaiya S, et al. The anti-diabetic activities, gut microbiota composition, the anti-inflammatory effects of Scutellaria–coptis herb couple against insulin resistance-model of diabetes involving the toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2019;237:202-214. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2019.02.040.
  • Xu Y, Chen X-X, Jiang Y-X, Zhang D-D. Ethyl Acetate Fraction from Hedyotis diffusa plus Scutellaria barbata Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Regulating miR-155 Expression and JNK Signaling Pathway. Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM). 2018;2018:1-11. doi:10.1155/2018/3593408.
  • Zhang C, Sheng J, Sarsaiya S, et al. The anti-diabetic activities, gut microbiota composition, the anti-inflammatory effects of Scutellaria–coptis herb couple against insulin resistance-model of diabetes involving the toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2019;237:202-214. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2019.02.040.
  • Xu Y, Chen X-X, Jiang Y-X, Zhang D-D. Ethyl Acetate Fraction from Hedyotis diffusa plus Scutellaria barbata Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Regulating miR-155 Expression and JNK Signaling Pathway. Evidence-bas
  • Yubin Lu, Ph.D., L.Ac, Dr. Lu Herbology, Herbs from Root and Rhizomes, Class 48
  • Bensky, Dan, et al. Chinese Herbal Medicine. Eastland Press, 2015.
  • Du Z, Huang Y, Chen Y, Chen Y. Combination effects of baicalin with levofloxacin against biofilm-related infections. American Journal Of Translational Research. 2019;11(3):1270-1281
  • Wu S-C, Chu X-L, Su J-Q, et al. Baicalin protects mice against Salmonella typhimurium infection via the modulation of both bacterial virulence and host response. Phytomedicine: International Journal Of Phytotherapy And Phytopharmacology. 2018;48:21-31. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2018.04.063.

© Dr. Patrick Lynch, January 2024

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